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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Radio-frequency dielectric heating in industry found in the catalog.

Radio-frequency dielectric heating in industry

T.L Wilson

Radio-frequency dielectric heating in industry

by T.L Wilson

  • 57 Want to read
  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Electric Power Research Institute .
Written in English


Edition Notes

StatementWilson, T. L.
The Physical Object
Pagination165p. $0.00 C.1 $0.00 C.2.
Number of Pages165
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17587700M

The first and best known application of the radio frequency (RF) technology in the food industry is the post-baking drying of biscuits, crackers, breakfast cereals, etc. Lately, Stalam has been introducing to the world markets many other innovative food processing technologies based on the RF heating method, such as the rapid defrosting of frozen fish, meat, vegetables and other raw or. Thermex-Thermatron is the high-frequency heating specialist manufacturer of industrial microwave generators, industrial microwave ovens, industrial microwave dryers, and pultrusion preheaters, as well as complete lines of other RF heating equipment and systems. The advantages of this unique high frequency heating technology are numerous, and the technology is used on thousands of different.

This book presents an overview of how these technologies are being used in agricultural systems. The main purpose of the book is to provide a glimpse of what is possible and encourage practitioners in the engineering and agricultural industries to explore how radio-frequency and microwave systems might further enhance the agricultural industry. Capacitive (Radio Frequency) dielectric heating has great potential for achieving rapid and uniform heating patterns in foods, providing safe, high quality food products. (RF) dielectric heating in food processing and preservation, the current applications of the technology in the industry, the potential use of mathematical modeling for.

system to control the sample temperature during dielectric property measurements (Guan et al. , Wang et al. b). Another common method of temperature control is placing the dielec-tric probe and sample holder in a heating/cooling chamber throughout measurement. Radio-Frequency Heating . Radio Frequency Processing in the Food Industry. Radio Frequency Drying is a simple precise process and is in common use in the food industry with proven processes available for a wide range of applications such as: efficient heat transfer results in faster product transfer and reduced oven length. Rapid and Even Heating - of doughs.


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Radio-frequency dielectric heating in industry by T.L Wilson Download PDF EPUB FB2

Probably well over a million Industrial RF heating installations for various applications have been sold worldwide in the last sixty years. Radio Frequency Dielectric Heating was originally introduced into the Food Industry in the UK around the beginning of the ’s.(ref.

1 and 2). Dielectric heating, including microwave and radio-frequency (RF) energy, generates heat volumetrically throughout a food product rather than relying on the heat conduction, and thus offers the potential for quickly heating solid and semisolid by: 2.

Book Description. Radio-Frequency Heating in Food Processing: Principles Radio-frequency dielectric heating in industry book Applications covers the fundamentals of radio-frequency (RF) heating and the use of RF-heating technologies in modern food processing, preservation, and related industries.

Focusing on industrial and lab-scale applications where RF heating has been employed successfully or reported to have potential benefits over. Radio Frequency Drying for the Paper Converting Industry High Frequency dielectric heating is proven as the most efficient method of drying water based adhesives, emulsions and coatings at high production speeds.

Water is so receptive to the effect of. Radio frequency (RF) heating has been used in several industries and has a great potential to be used as an alternative pasteurization technology in the food industry.

RF is also referred to as dielectric loss heating and dielectric heating. RF-H is classified as a novel thermal processing method in the field of food engineering (Jiao et al., ).

Probably well over a million Industrial RF heating installations for various applications have been sold worldwide in the last sixty years. Radio Frequency Dielectric Heating was originally introduced into the Food Industry in the UK around the beginning of the ’s. Dielectric heating uses electromagnetic radiation in the frequency range kHz to GHz.

The radio frequency (RF) range is from kHz to MHz, and the microwave (MW) range is from MHz to GHz (Table ). TABLE Dielectric Heating Frequency Ranges. Microwave- and Radio Frequency Heating In a high frequency heating process, the high frequency waves heat the lossy dielectric in the complete volume by penetrating into the material, depending on the penetration depth of the waves.

Provided the material is not too thick, the high frequency waves transfer more or less. The RF frequency bands used in dielectric heating are centered on MHz, MHz and MHz. These frequencies are reserved specifically for use by Industrial, Scientific and Medical purposes (the I.S.M.

band) to avoid possible interference with other users of. Radio-frequency (RF) dielectric heating/drying has been used in various industrial applications for many years, especially in wood, textile, and some food industry processes. Since dielectric heating transfers energy directly to the product (volumetric heating), applications of RF present obvious advantages over other conventional techniques.

The development of dielectric heating applications in food industry started in the radio frequency range in the s (Püschner, ). The desired energy transfer rate enhancement led to an increased frequency: the microwaves.

Dielectric heating, also known as electronic heating, radio frequency heating, and high-frequency heating, is the process in which a radio frequency alternating electric field, or radio wave or microwave electromagnetic radiation heats a dielectric material. At higher frequencies, this heating is caused by molecular dipole rotation within the dielectric.

Abstract: Heat is generated in a variety of dielectric or electrical insulating materials when subjected to radio and microwave frequencies. This phenomenon has been successfully exploited for over 40 years by industry in a wide range of applications. Radio frequency (RF) is used for about 90% of all dielectric heating applications, but the more recent development of microwave heating is.

The company has produced dielectric heating systems for a broad range of applications ranging in size to kW output. Many of the RFC systems in the field today, were “firsts” developed on the basis of feasibility studies conducted in the company’s applications laboratory.

Abstract In recent years, the interest in Radio frequency (RF) heating technology has increased significantly and its applications have increased by several folds in the food and material.

attributes. Recently, the use of dielectric heating systems, such as radio frequency (RF) energy, has become the choice of many pro-cessing industries due to their shorter processing times. The advantages of reduced thawing time are to avoid deterio-ration of food product quality, inhibit microbial activities and.

Purchase Microwave/RF Applicators and Probes for Material Heating, Sensing, and Plasma Generation - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book.

ISBNThe dielectric or radio frequency heating equipment available today for wood gluing purposes is a highly engineered apparatus that contains all possible safeguards to make the operation a safe and easy one.

The actual operation of the equipment is usually very simple and the operator has a minimum of instruments to watch during the curing cycle.

A technology that uses dielectric heating and radio frequency energy to destroy destructive pests lurking within wood products is closer to reaching the marketplace after a recent commercial trial at Penn State’s University Park campus.

Radio-frequency heating, process of heating materials through the application of radio waves of high frequency— i.e., ab hertz (cycles per second).

Two methods of radio-frequency heating have been developed. One of these, induction heating, has proved highly effective for heating metals and other materials that are relatively good electric conductors.Radio-frequency welding, also known as dielectric welding and high-frequency welding, is a plastic welding process that utilizes high-frequency electric fields to induce heating and melting of thermoplastic base materials.

The electric field is applied by a pair of electrodes after the parts being joined are clamped together. The clamping force is maintained until the joint solidifies. Advantages of this. Radio-Frequency Heating in Food Processing: Principles and Applications covers the fundamentals of radio-frequency (RF) heating and the use of RF-heating technologies in modern food processing, preservation, and related industries.

Focusing on industrial and lab-scale applications where RF heating has been employed successfully or reported to have potential benefits over conventional heating.